Film Review: Young Frankenstein (1974)

I know that this film has been out of the cinema and on video and dvd for some time, but I thought it was worth a more recent review and attention. Most spoof films these days, are not that brilliant, to be honest. Instead of one genre or original story to use as a plot, they use maybe 6, and all the characters to populate the scenes. Which is somewhat sad, when  you think of earlier spoof films that are more entertaining and are less well known.

Written by Gene Wilder, (Who also portrayed the main character) and Mel Brooks, and directed by the latter, this spoof of the Frankenstein story is very funny, even on repeated viewings. Full of one liners and references to the original, and a cameo by Gene Hackman, this is one well made classic that shouldn't be ignored for something more recent. The supporting cast includes Marty Feldman, Cloris Leachman, Teri Garr, Peter Boyle and Madeline Kahn. The latter also starred alongside Gene Wilder in another Mel Brooks film, Blazing Saddles.

Comments

  1. Today's quotes come from other Mel Brooks films:

    "Jonathan Harker: Are you saying that Count Dracula is our vampire?
    Van Helsing: Yes!... and no...
    Jonathan Harker: Then what are you saying?
    Van Helsing: I'm saying no. But I'm leeeeaning towards yes.
    Dr. Steward: Then you're saying yes.
    Van Helsing: No.
    Dr. Steward: Then you're saying no.
    Van Helsing: Not necessarily.
    Jonathan Harker: You sound dubious.
    Van Helsing: No -I'm positive!
    Jonathan Harker: Of what?
    Van Helsing: Of my theory!
    Jonathan Harker: And that would be?
    Van Helsing: The theory of Yes- or no."

    "Hedley Lamarr: Men, you are about to embark on a great crusade to stamp out runaway decency in the west. Now you men will only be risking your lives, whilst I will be risking an almost certain Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor."

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Film Review: Tomb Raider

TV Show Review: Misfits

TV Series Review: Strike